Calloway’s Timely Tips for February

Timely Tips for February Gardeners from Calloway’s and Cornelius

February may be the toughest gardening month. Thank goodness it’s short. In North Texas we do not know what kind of weather to expect from day to day or from day to night. Keep in mind that the average last freeze for North Texas area is not until mid-March. Even so, many plants normally begin to show signs of growth in February, which makes it the perfect time, to get outside and work in the yard.

This is the perfect time to get your garden tools in good working order. So that when Spring arrives you are ready to plant those plants, mow the grass and prepare all those beds in preparation for a beautiful landscape.

Pruning is both an art and a necessary maintenance function. Most trees and shrubs can be lightly pruned at any time; however mid-winter is generally the best time for major pruning.

Summer flowering trees and shrubs should be pruned before buds begin to swell for Spring, generally they bloom on new growth; examples are crape myrtle, butterfly bush, spiraea and honeysuckle. If those seed heads on crepe myrtles bother you, remove them this month. Just clip back the ends of the branches, do not destroy the beauty of the gracefully sculptured trunks by severe pruning. Please never top a crape myrtle. Spring flowering plants such as azalea, Carolina jessamine, wisteria, forsythia, and quince should not be pruned until after the blooms are spent.

February is the best time for pruning most roses. Remove any old and diseased canes then cut the remaining canes back by 50%. Make your cuts above a bud that faces away from the center of the plant.

Early to mid-February marks the time to apply a pre-emergent herbicide for lawns. These products kill germinating seed. A second application may be needed in late May or early June. Remember that the best defense against lawn weeds is a healthy, thick turf resulting from good management.

Trim back perennials and ornamental grasses before the new growth appears in Spring. Clean up around plants and mulch well to protect.

This is a great time to visit your Calloway’s/Cornelius Nursery. New plants are arriving now for late winter and early spring planting. By planting early, plants will be off to a better start and can become adjusted before the stresses of summer arrive.

While at your Calloway’s/Cornelius Nursery treat your special Valentine with beautiful, fresh, living flowers! The rose can be enjoyed all year; cool season flowers such as pansies, primrose and cyclamen can add a burst of color to your landscape, patio or garden. That special person would love a container filled with exotic blooms and foliage comprising orchids, bromeliads, cyclamens and more.

Information courtesy of Calloway’s Nursery ©2016, www.calloways.com. Attribution to Calloway’s required for all use and reproduction.

Calloway’s Timely Tips for January

Timely Tips for January Gardeners from Calloway’s and Cornelius

With the Holiday decorations all packed away revive those empty indoor spaces in your home with living breathing houseplants! Researchers for NASA while developing technology that would allow humans to live in a closed environment on the moon or Mars, discovered that houseplants are the quickest and most effective filters of common dangerous air pollutants. One medium-sized houseplant is needed every 100 square feet of living area to achieve this natural filtering of the air in your home. With the great variety of houseplants you can dress up a room and make the air better too. Keep the leaves clear of dust since most pollutants are absorbed by the leaves.

It may be chilly outside at this time of the year, but winter is a perfect time for a number of outdoor chores. Just consider how much better outdoor chores like soil preparation, planting, transplanting and pruning can be done without toiling in hot summer temperatures.

If you need to move a plant to a different spot in the landscape, this is the month to accomplish this job.

Most plants move best when they are fully dormant as a result of prolonged exposure to cold temperatures. Remove some of the top growth to compensate for the inevitable loss of some of the roots. Once the plant is moved, water thoroughly, apply root stimulator, and a few inches of mulch over the root area.

January is a great month to accomplish pruning of fruit trees. Annual pruning keeps the harvest within reach, thins crowded branches, allowing more light to penetrate developing fruit and stimulates new growth for next year’s crop. Shade trees can also be pruned at this time.

Fruit trees and vines can be planted at this time as the ground usually does not freeze here in north Texas. You can also prepare the soil for new flower, rose or shrub beds by mixing plenty of organic material like compost and Calloway’s Organic Flower Bed Mix or Tree and Shrub Mix. This way the soil is ready for immediate planting when temperatures get a little warmer.

Fertilize pansies to keep them actively growing. Houseplants can be fertilized with reduced rates of water-soluble fertilizer this month. Do not over-water your houseplants.

Birds of all kinds appreciate a constant source of seed, suet and water during the winter and you will enjoy the activity they create in your backyard. Just remember once you start feeding, you should keep it up through the winter.

Additional help and information can always be attained from one our Texas Certified Nursery Professional.

Information courtesy of Calloway’s Nursery ©2016, www.calloways.com. Attribution to Calloway’s required for all use and reproduction.

Calloway’s December Yard of the Month Honors

Congrats to Hillcrest Estates 121 Residents of 4205 Tanglewood for Calloway’s December Yard of the Month Honors! Beautiful Yard! If you would like to nominate a neighbors yard or your own, please email us at [email protected] They will receive a $25 gift card to Calloway’s Nursery!DSC_4205

Calloway’s December Timely Tips

Timely Tips for December Gardeners from Calloway’s and Cornelius

Working in your garden is an excellent escape during the holidays. It’s a great time of year to do some of the heavy work in the landscape as opposed to sweating it up in the heat of the summer.

Don’t put up the mower yet. Although turf grasses have stopped growing, you can use the mower to chop up and recycle the leaves back into the lawn or for a compost pile.

Prepare gas-powered engines for winter. The owner’s manual is the best guide to winterizing a lawn mower, tiller, garden tractor or other power equipment.

Drain and store garden hoses and watering equipment in a readily accessible location. Lawns and other plants may need an occasional watering during prolonged dry spell.

In general, once the weather gets and stays cold, pruning of deciduous plants (ones that lose their leaves) can be safely done. Evergreen hedges can be sheared or cut back in the winter also. Wait until February to prune your roses. Remember – Do Not Top your Crapemyrtles! Simply prune to remove seed heads and shape.

Prepare for the cold weather before it hits! One of the best things you can do for your landscape plants is to provide a 2 to 3 inch layer of mulch. Mulching is necessary year round but during the colder periods it provides a layer of insulation for the roots. Water your landscape well before a cold spell. A drought stressed plant is more susceptible to freeze damage. For more tender plants, purchase frost cloth for extra protection. Cover the plant completely allowing the edges to come all the way to the ground, utilizing the heat which radiates from the ground.

December is a perfect time to plant trees and shrubs so they can develop a strong root system for next Spring. Cool weather color such as Pansies, Snapdragons, Cyclamen, Flowering Cabbage and Kale add splashes of color to your landscape. Spring flowering bulbs can be planted now once they have been properly chilled.

Make your home beautiful for the Holidays with a stunning assortment of floral quality Poinsettias, Cyclamen, freshest greenery and Christmas Trees. Add a mix of new indoor and tropical plants to energize your home décor.

Remember to provide food and water for the birds this winter. You can attract just as many birds with a bird bath as with food, especially during the dry spells. To draw a diversity of birds provide a variety of seeds, like sunflower, thistle, safflower and millet; plus suet. Once you begin putting out bird food, continue feeding them through the spring time.

Enjoy your time with family and friends. Have a very Merry Christmas and blessed Happy New Year!

Information courtesy of Calloway’s Nursery ©2015, www.calloways.com.

Resident Holiday Event

Hillcrest Estates 121 Resident Holiday Event

Cookies, Cocoa, Pizzas, Ornament Making & Photos with Santa

This Saturday, Dec. 5th from 4pm-6pm

Gazebo area at RobinCreek & Sweetwater

Bring your camera

Free Ornaments for the kids to make and Free Tickets to an upcoming

Texas Legends basketball game for everyone that visits Santa!

We will also go Caroling on Robincreek after the event!

Happy Holidays!

Calloway’s November Yard of the Month Honors

Congrats to Hillcrest Estates 121 Residents of 11001 Water Road for Calloway’s November Yard of the Month Honors! Beautiful Fall Yard! If you would like to nominate a neighbors yard or your own, or even by on our committee, please email us at [email protected]

DSC_3685

Timely Tips for November Gardeners from Calloway’s and Cornelius Nursery

This is the perfect time to plant your chilled bulbs for spring; they should be in the ground before the first frost, so plant now while the soil is still easy to work. Iris, daylilies and gladiolas should also be planted at this time, although they are not “true” bulbs, but rhizomes, tubers and corms, respectively. Yet all of these like bulbs require the cooler soil of winter to generate healthy new growth in spring.

Transform your landscape with the addition of fresh, colorful blooms! Pansies are by far the most popular Winter color. The “Matrix” Pansy has been outstanding for our Texas weather. It will not “stretch” during bouts of warm temperatures and is bred to grow out, not up. This compact grower offers shorter stems to support large colorful blooms. Dianthus (also known as “Pinks”), Snapdragons, Cyclamen, Violas and the fragrant Alyssum are also good choices for cold tolerant annuals. Ornamental Cabbage and Kale provide interesting texture in the landscape as well as color. For best effect, limit your planting to two or three colors per bed.

The key to growing beautiful annual flowers is soil preparation. Work Calloway’s Flowerbed Mix into the soil, or organic compost, to a depth of 6” to 8”. Adding Calloway’s Flower Food to the soil at the time of planting will provide the extra nutrients for growth and blooms. Remember to add 2 to 3 inches of mulch to all beds to reduce moisture loss, prevent weeds from germinating, and to insulate the soil from the cold.

Using the same colorful annuals will add a splash of color to your patio containers. Fill your container with fresh potting soil, plant food and your choice of these beautiful annuals to brighten your winter. Keep them watered as necessary and remove faded flowers to encourage repeat blooming.

If you want those beautiful Texas Bluebonnets in the Spring, sow the seed in early November!

Please remember the birds! Texas is a haven for birds. No other state in the United States has more species within its boundaries. There are currently over 620 species documented in Texas, which is almost 75 percent of all bird species recorded in the continental United States. To attract the widest variety of wild birds, you should consider placing a wide variety of bird feeders and food around your yard.

Information courtesy of Calloway’s Nursery ©2015, www.calloways.com. Attribution to Calloway’s.

Calloway’s October Yard of the Month Honors

Congrats to Hillcrest Estates 121 Residents of 10715 Blue Bay for Calloway’s October Yard of the Month Honors! Beautiful Fall Yard! If you would like to nominate a neighbors yard or your own, or even by on our committee, please email us at [email protected]

DSC_3497

Home Owner Association, Frisco, TX